Browse Tag: Google Voice

Google Voice + Asterisk = Sweet VoIP Lovin!

While I’ve had a Google Voice (GV) account since their Grandcentral beginnings, I never really began using it full time until I received my Tmobile G1. I decided to use it full on and never again have to send out another “Here is my new number” txt/email.

So when my friend Ben mentioned a new (to me) product called Incredible PBX that is built on Asterisk and said it used GV as it’s voice trunk instead of SIP/IAX my interest was peaked. While their website confused the snot out of me, I finally was able to get everything running in a virtual machine using Oracle VirtualBox. Below is the process and if I miss anything or you have questions please feel free to let me know. (I’ve since reinstalled on a older laptop with a dead screen that was crying for a use.)

So to get started head on over to Incrediblepbx.com and select the Downloads tab. Under this tab you will see a list of all the available downloads. Select the newest ISO release to download (as of this writing it is 1.7.5.5.5).

I won’t go through the process of setting up a virtual machine since if you’re reading this I’m sure you know how to. The only snag I had in Virtual Box was I had to enable IO APIC in order for the ISO to boot properly.

Begin Installation:

Just press Enter unless you know you need/want something different.

Most of the settings are pretty generic during the setup of CentOS. Region, keyboard and root password. Take a break and get something to drink, this will take a few minutes.

If you are installing this in a VM be sure to remove the ISO before rebooting. If you forget then just shut it down, remove the ISO and power back up.

Once it finishes booting up you will see the below screen. Select PIAF-Purple and select OK

.

This will being the process of installing everything from the Internet for the most part(Google Voice integration is separate.).

While this is installing go ahead and register a new Google Voice account. It is recommended to create a new Gmail account with a random name because of the way Gtalk takes over voice calls when logged into Gmail.

Login to your new google.com/voice account and we need to change some settings.
First you will need to setup a real phone. I used my wife’s cell phone just be sure to turn off direct voicemail access and turn off any call forwarding to this phone unless you want to keep it enabled (not recommended).
Under https://www.google.com/voice#callsettings change these settings to the below settings:

  • Call Screening – Off
  • Caller ID (Incoming) – Display Caller’s Number
  • Caller ID (Outgoing) – Don’t Change Anything
  • Do Not Disturb – OFF

Once you are done installing PIAF-Purple and registering your Google Voice account there are a few more steps to be completed from the command line.

Running The Incredible PBX Installer. Log into your server as root and issue the following commands to download and run The Incredible PBX installer:
cd /root
wget http://incrediblepbx.com/incrediblepbx18.x
chmod +x incrediblepbx18.x
./incrediblepbx18.x
passwd-master

passwd-master will setup all of the passwords on the system to be used when logging into the various web applications.

Now login to your server by going to http://serverip and open FreePBX Administration.
You will need to setup X-Lite on your computer unless you already have a VoIP phone or ATA/analog phone. There are already extensions setup and getting your password is pretty easy. Under the Extensions tab is a list

of all the extensions already setup, 701-715.
Your password is listed under secret. You will need this to register any device with the server. In X-Lite go to Softphone -> Account Settings and replace the highlighted options with your own.

After you press OK your client should register with the server. If there is an error check and double check your password. If that doesn’t clear things up try rebooting the server before starting over. This seemed to clear things up for me more than once.

Once this is complete try a test call! I call a local number for time/temp to get a feel for the voice quality. If you’d like to try it then phone number is 15802346100.

I’ve been able to place/receive calls over Sipdroid on my G1 and MyTouch3g, X-Lite Softphone and using Ekiga from my Ubuntu laptop over my Hamachi VPN while at work.

The WAF is always a goal for me so I bought a Linksys SPA1001 from Ebay and combined with a VTech from Amazon she has been very please and so have I.

Well if you’ve got this far thanks for reading. It was a blast getting back to Asterisk and seeing how far they’ve come since the last time I messed around with it back in 2003 is just amazing.

Links & Credits

EDIT: Thanks to floodbar for letting me know that I forgot to include the steps for installing the IncrediblePBX part and setting up the passwords, thanks man!

I’m an Android groupie, so what!

There I said it. I’m an Android groupie.  Though Wikipedia describes a groupie as someone who seeks sexual intimacy with a celebrity or musician, I’m not quite that into Andy.

Back in early 2008 I was still a Nokia loyalist. After having owned only Nokia’s since I began using a cell phone in the mid-late 90’s, I always felt a cell phone could do more. Below is my list of phones that I’ve owned since the dumb candy bar era.

  • Nokia e62 – Cool phone, bad AT&T crippling by taking out WiFi and their software stack made it slow.
  • Nokia n82 – Great phone, best camera in a phone ever, small but usable screen.
  • HTC Dream (G1) – Best idea, worst battery, decent cpu, decent screen and my first Android phone.
  • Blackberry Curve 8310 (Work) – Great for email and calls (sometimes, thanks AT&T), crap for everything else IMO.
  • HTC Magic (MyTouch 3g) – Better phone w/ the increased storage space – same decent CPU.
  • Blackberry Bold 9000 (Work) – Better phone, worse hardware quality then the 8310, better screen and 3G/WiFi.

I preach Android to all my iPhone, WinMo and Blackberry friends. I believe in what Android is doing to the smartphone market and the strengths it has over IOS. The cons of Android are shrinking with every release with Froyo I think pretty much bringing it up to speed with IOS 4.

So as my friends convert to Android they are skeptical at first. Besides app purchases most of the apps are on all four major platforms now. But each one has been happier than ever. I was most leery about the iPhone converts; some have bought four phones in a row from Apple. But thankfully AT&T has the Captivate that is based on the Samsung Galaxy S platform so it’s a great alternative to the iPhone.

I really hope Google continues the Android march and continues to spur companies to build even better hardware but please improve the battery life. I understand these phones do more then ever, but 16 hours on a charge is pretty much crap if you actually wanted to use your phone while not near a power outlet.

I think Nokia got caught up on Symbian and thought they could add enough widgets and screen sizes would compete against Android and IOS. But I think what they failed to see is that an OS born from dumb phones could not compete with a smartphone OS. They are just on a different level in terms of usefulness. RIM has always been centered on Email as the first use and everything else second. To me that is the main reason RIM has become so entrenched in the business world. But every month I have users giving their Blackberries back and getting an iPhone on their personal account. As this scale tips I can see us only having a small number of Blackberry phones mostly due to how AT&T has their corporate minute sharing setup.

Going forward I can see Android topping the market share with IOS as usual in strong second place with RIM and Nokia falling behind unless they really revamp their approach. Thanks Google for buying Android, geeks every have a real phone to use and hack.

Google Voice Transition to Gapps Account

This service is one of my most used and favorite apps on the web. Basically it’s one phone number that routes to all your phones. Be it a Gizmo5 line, Skype (with some hacks), cell phone, home phone, etc. This week they rolled out a new feature allowing you to call directly from Gmail. It’s truly a great app if you are using an Android smartphone. The Google Voice integration is top notch including eliminating the need for a txt message plan with my carrier (T-Mobile).

This was all well and good until I began the transition to a full Google account with my Google Apps service. In the past my Voice account was tied to my gmail.com address along with Reader, Analytics and Picasa. When I was accepted into the beta this became a problem because I could no longer login to my gmail account with my secondary account (lukenbaugh.com). One by one Google started to transition the apps over for use with my lukenbaugh.com account. Voice seemed to be the only holdout so against their warning saying it wouldn’t work, I signed up to have my Voice account moved from my gmail account to my lukenbaugh.com. It took a few days but everything moved over nicely including past voicemails and recorded names/greetings.

Here is the spreadsheet from Google to get your Google Voice account moved.


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